A Compassionate Insight Into What Dying People Want by Dr. David Kuhl

What Dying People Want is a doctor writing about his very human journey through the suffering of the terminally ill and the desired emotional and practical responses from health care professionals. Most importantly, Kuhl addresses situations and how to approach them for best results, always bearing in mind that what the patient most seeks is some sense of control over his life and the treatment of his illness.

I remember it was always a hassle getting out the door on the morning of Chris’ doctor’s appointments.  He liked them to be early in the day, I think because he felt best able to cope then–his energy levels seemed slightly higher in the morning, though he soon flagged.

We lived a good thirty kilometres drive through rush hour traffic, and at the end, paid horrendous hospital parking lot fees.  Then there were the interminable hallways, steps and elevators to negotiate within St. Paul’s. For Chris, these sessions were exhausting.  Near the end, the toll on him was severe.

But he had been treated at St. Paul’s from the night of his very first heart attack, when we lived in the West End five minutes drive from the facility. And in the end, the young doctor who had treated him then became the head of St Paul’s Cardiology Department, and in the years between, he and Chris built up a good rapport.

So David Kuhl’s book, based on research done at St. Paul’s struck a chord with me.

Several aspects of the book appeal to me.  Kuhl introduces each chapter with quotes from patients, followed by an anecdote, legend or myth that speaks to the theme of each chapter.  He uses his own experiences and those of terminally ill people to illustrate their concerns.

I found it to be practical and profound. Any comments you may have on the book would be appreciated.  Just email me at margaretjean64@google.com

These next few blogs are based Dr. David Kuhl’s book, What Dying People Want., based on his research and experience as a palliative care physician serving at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, B.C.

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